Simple Church

Published November 15, 2017 by lynn k scott

Our church is rebranding.  This is new for me, because growing up, we went to the same church my entire life and it never changed.  I even was married in that church.  With the rebranding, we are establishing ourself apart from another church that we have been getting confused with.  I think it’s a great idea.  Without change, there cannot be growth.  I am from a small country town.  Even though I moved to a city, I still like my church small, but we all have room for growth.

God’s message is simple.

Simple

After years of searching for my “home church”, I have found it.  I’ve been at Simple Church for about six months now.  In that time, besides being allowed to drink all the coffee I could want, I have met people who are becoming like family.  I’ve even been asked to help with providing refreshments for fellowship after church.  This was a blessing, because I enjoy cooking and feeding others and providing a snack or meal, appeases that particular need.

Having moved 3,000 miles from where I used to call home, restarted my life, remarried, had another child, gone through some really difficult trials and now battling cancer, knowing there is a place, where I am accepted in my jeans, my tattoos and all my other short-comings, brings a sense of peace.

Every week, the message comes from the Bible. It’s straight-forward; can’t get any simpler than that.  Prayers, contemporary music and singing fills the room as well.  There’s a song, “Old Church Choir“, by Zach Williams that sums up my feelings.

If you’ve ever been to a church with a choir, you know they can project a lively happiness with an upbeat tempos and their voices.  You are drawn in, want to be part of and appreciate the energy they are providing.  Memories are created through the music.

Stepping into Simple Church gives me that feeling every week!  Even when I was brand new to the church, I was welcomed.  It just wasn’t an obligatory, “hello” by someone assigned to meet the ‘new people’.  It was a genuine welcoming and caring that you were there.

It’s a church where I feel comfortable bringing my daughter.  Having a tween child brings it’s own challenges.  Knowing she is making friends, likes the children and their parents and wants to go instead of fighting me not to, says a lot too.Simple church

If there are little ones to consider, there’s a nursery for them to play and relax in during the service.

All in all, if you are looking for a small, community-based church, that offers genuine caring and compassion, with what I like to call a ‘come as you are’ mentality, then Simple Church might be the place for you.

If you are in the Solano County area, come check out 10:00 a.m. service.  We’d love to meet you!

Advertisements

Pork Rack Chop with a Parmesan Mash and Sage Brown Butter

Published November 7, 2017 by lynn k scott

Reblog from wishtodish.co.uk

I love to make new dishes…this one is even gluten-free! I can’t wait to try it.

Wish to Dish

Yes, this is as good as it sounds….

sage and brown butter pork chops with a parmesan mash wish to dish recipe (3)sage and brown butter pork chops with a parmesan mash wish to dish recipe (11)sage and brown butter pork chops with a parmesan mash wish to dish recipe

Welcome to my first winter warmer dish of the season. This definitely falls into the indulgent category of my recipes (a quick glance at the amount of butter and cheese in the ingredients list can tell you that much) but when has a little indulgence hurt anyone?

I have created this as a one person recipe because even though I know it is so easy to order a takeaway or just have beans on toast when eating alone; sometimes it is fun and important to treat yourself too! Help yourself to a glass of wine, put on your favourite album or podcast and really enjoy the process of cooking – it can be a great way to clear your head at the end of a long day. An even greater perk is that you get to enjoy a truly delicious meal at…

View original post 531 more words

Cancer Journey: Part 2

Published November 6, 2017 by lynn k scott

I’ve been on oral chemotherapy for a week now.  I have been lucky not to experience many side effects.  The worst, so far, has been nausea and fatigue.  Those who know me, know I am always on the go or doing something.  Friends ask me if I know what the word relax means.

My anger has subsided a bit.  I am still less than pleased with my oncology team.  However, I am doing my best to see the positives in all this.  Positives with cancer?  Seriously?  Yup!

I truly believe God has a plan for me; for all of us, really.  I have known so much suffering, loss and tragedy.  What’s a stage 3 cancer diagnosis added to all that, right?

I was speaking to our pastor’s wife yesterday and shared how I recently thought of a positive to having cancer:  it’s brought my oldest and I closer.  One could say we’ve had a tumultuous relationship.  We were having a rough patch prior to my diagnosis.  We had only recently started speaking again.

Once I told him about the diagnosis, our relationship improved.  It reaffirmed how precious life is and how it’s not promised to anyone.  So, if cancer brought us closer together, than I am grateful.

Another positive is, as a friend pointed out when she heard the news, this disease would bring me closer to God.  She was right.  This struggle is not mine alone.  He is with me through this.  It’s my job to trust in Him and give Him control of the situation.  He has guided me to a church with very supportive and caring people.  He will stay beside me on this journey.

I am also learning to rest and pay attention to my health.  Currently, I have energy for about half a day.  I am still working a full-time job, homeschooling my daughter every evening and running a household.  Is my house as clean as I want it?  Heaven’s no!  Truth be told, it’s driving me nuts to have clutter and not having certain areas spotless.  Will we survive?  Yup!

My daughter and husband have taken on a few of “mom’s chores”.  They are aware I just can’t do it all or that it might be postponed if i need to take care of it.  I am taking time to spend a extra hour or two in bed on the weekends.  I am going to sleep hours before the clock approaches midnight.

Today was the first day I had to wear a mask at work, as my immune system becomes more compromised.  I was NOT happy having to do this.  Yet, a friend suggested having my artist daughter (who’s 11), draw happy faces and butterflies on my masks for me.  I’m going to give her a few to try out.  She’ll get to be expressive, I get to count this as art for homeschool and I should have some “designer” masks to make this journey a bit more bearable.

So as much as I hashtag, #cancersucks, there are silver linings to be seen.  You just need to know where to look.

Cancer Journey: Part 1

Published October 20, 2017 by lynn k scott

I am the first to admit that I am not the ideal patient.  Heck, I’m a barely tolerable patient.  Regardless of my good/bad patient status, effective communication between the doctors/staff and the patient is top priority.  It’s the foundation of a trustful, working relationship between the two.

I admit, I’m extremely direct.  I become irritated very quickly when I have stated expectations and they are either ignored or downplayed.  Add in ill-mannered office staff and a stressful situation turns downright ugly.

Now, we are talking about a cancer center.  A place where emotions run high; especially after patients go and they have been newly diagnosed.  You would think a medical assistant, walking into the waiting room, would have the faintest inkling you don’t try to get the patient’s attention by saying, “hey”.

Sorry, I don’t answer to that.

I was playing a game on my phone when the first “hey” was said.  My husband happened to look up, but didn’t say anything.  As I was non-responsive, this person thought saying, “HEY!” was the next course of action.  This time I did look up.  She stated the doctor’s name and that I needed to come with her.

STRIKE 1

We walk into the room, where she informs me she will take my vitals.  Hmmm….last I knew, I had the right to consent to any and all treatment; even vitals.  Based on this poor medical assistant’s communication skills in the lobby and now telling me what she will be doing; I think not.

My New York personality emerged to take center stage.  I told her she would not be taking vitals.  She thought putting her hand on her hip, telling me she needed those vitals and whatever blah blah blah she uttered after (I stopped listening) only reinforced my stubborn nature and I promptly dismissed her.

STRIKE 2

She didn’t take kindly to that.  Arguing with me wasn’t going to work.  If nothing, I’m a stubborn, Irish New Yorker and I’m pictured in the dictionary next to “Stubborn” (ok not really, but I should be).  I still have the right to say no and apparently, she wasn’t taught that patients give consent.  I have a personal issue with being told what I will and won’t do by people who are not in charge.  I didn’t deem vitals necessary for a consultation appointment.  Not to mention, tell me you are taking vitals instead of asking if it’s ok to vitals will get them declined EVERY TIME!

The medical assistant walks through another office door where she proceeds to loudly complain about me.  Well, my first oncology visit is off to a great start.  I’m TICKED off and an unsuspecting doctor is going to walk through the door and he and I will be having words about his medical assistant.

Needless to say, the appointment did not go well.  He kept pushing IV chemotherapy when the benefits are barely above oral chemotherapy and have a lot more side effects.  I don’t know how many times I told him no to IV chemo, but it was obvious that was his preferred method of treatment.  I actually had to tell him not to mention it again.

My husband and I left the appointment and went to a bar.  Wishful thinking the alcohol would kill the cancer.  Oh well, the drink was needed and went down smooth.

Now, after more poor communication with the oncology office, we can’t find a location where I can get a blood draw to take a bunch of poison that will or won’t cure this cancer.  Apparently, the medical profession thinks everyone sits home all day and no one works.  They must think that because no blood draws after 4:00 p.m.

Now I could go to the cancer center.  However, their poor treatment of me and lack of communication skills raises my anxiety 10-fold.  I don’t even want to go there for the necessary appointments.

The situation is so bad, I’m looking at driving 20 minutes out of my way, and maybe incurring bridge toll, in order to go to a better facility because I’m not receiving proper care where I am.

My positive mood about getting through this has changed into being angry about having cancer.  I don’t want to see doctors, nurses and anyone associated with the medical profession.  I hate the cancer center.  It just reminds me of the family I lost.  It reminds me how this disease has made strong people weak before it took their lives.

Needless to say, my mood is less an amicable at the moment.  I deactivated my Facebook account because I am having trouble just interacting with online friends.  I will probably reactivate it again, but saying that I’m overwhelmed is an understatement.

 

Visiting the 1950s

Published October 17, 2017 by lynn k scott

Last night, for music and history, we used our smart TV and did a time-warp to the 1950s.  Since we have the technology, why not use it right?  In addition to the music, we discussed the clothing of the era and segregation.  She hadn’t heard the term before.  Once I explained what it was, she responds with, “That’s racism!”  She also picked up on the fact, that if her father and I had met in the 1950s, we probably wouldn’t have been together; being I am white and he is Filipino.  We have done our best to teach our daughter color doesn’t define a person; their actions do.

First up, Elvis Presley.  We discussed “Elvis the Pelvis”, the Ed Sullivan Show and how he was only filmed from the waist up.  We watched a clip from “Jailhouse Rock“.  My daughter giggled.  She’s been exposed to Elvis before because he is the King of Rock ‘n Roll and I’m a huge fan.  We can also thank reruns of “Full House” and “Uncle Jesse” for her Elvis knowledge.

From Elvis, we headed over to watch Bill Haley and the Comments.  When it was time to “Rock Around The Clock“, the lil miss jumped up off the couch and shouted, “dance with me!”  She was having a blast.  That last until my dog decided my daughter was getting far too much attention he was going to cut in on our fun.

From there we discussed a variety of musical artists and jumped over to watch Ritchie Valens in action.  We discussed his, Buddy Holly’s and the Big Bopper’s untimely deaths.  While I showed her pictures of the real Ritchie, we watched the clip of Lou Diamond Phillips portraying Ritchie and singing La Bamba.   We discussed how his name was changed to a more “mainstream” name for the times.

Our last music clips were courtesy of the Everly Brothers.  “All I Have To Do Is Dream” and “Cathy’s Clown” were the two selections we watched.  Of the clips my daughter watched, surprisingly, “All I Have To Do Is Dream” was her favorite.

I know “Cathy’s Clown” was from 1960, but it was my sister’s Kathi’s favorite song when she was young (because it had her name in it) and it’s a great segway to our next trip through the ages…

Get ready for the British invasion, the beginning of “boy bands” (thanks to the Beatles), add a little peace, love and hippies and we’re all set to discuss the 1960s.

 

 

 

A Musical Trip Through the Decades

Published October 15, 2017 by lynn k scott

Last night, we chose to go to Mel’s Diner for dinner.  If you’re unfamiliar with this restaurant, it’s reminiscent of a 1950s diner.  Many tables have small jukeboxes you can request songs on.  Then the songs play throughout the restaurant.  While the food is just on the average side, the atmosphere is fun.  The music played, either by patrons or the establishment, always provides good conversation topics and some memories.

I made a comment to my daughter how I received my first record player when I was 13 years old.  That I received my first record album and that’s the only one I had until I could buy more.  Her response, “what’s a record player?”   Oh!  What? Did the generation gap just come full circle?!

Break out the phone, look up, ‘record player’, and show here what I was talking about.  Then, being the homeschool mom I am, I have decided this upcoming week, we will have a musical trip through the decades.  That was after a Beatles’ song came on and she made a face and said there were better boy bands available.  Had to break it to my preteen that the Beatles were THE boy band, of that time.  She seems to forget her boy band, One Direction, wouldn’t be the teen idols they are today, without the Beatles paving the way for them.

Starting Monday, we will visit the 1950s.  Talk about the artists of that era.  Discuss issues going on during that time.  I get to “visit” Elvis again.  Ok, so I might have been born in the wrong generation.  Then we will move onto the 60s, 70s, 80s and finally the 90s; by week end.

It should be a fun way to incorporate some modern history via music.  After all, music plays such a huge role in marking important milestones in our lives and in making memories:  childhood memories, songs your parents liked (and you laughed at), first song danced to, wedding songs, songs your kids would stop crying to, break-up songs, etc.

I completely expect eye-rolling and “are we done yet” responses.  I do hope my lil miss can take away something as we dance our way through the ages.

Homeschooling: Life Skills

Published October 12, 2017 by lynn k scott

This year, our homeschooling journey has landed in the 6th grade.  In addition to my daughter learning how to take detailed notes, beginning to independent research, math, grammar, science, etc., she participates in Life Skills.

If we were in a brick and mortar school, the skills she is learning might be classified as home economics.  However, it’s more than just that.  She is learning to make grocery shopping lists, assisting with pet care, cooking for herself as well as her family, doing laundry, etc.

In our home, my husband doesn’t cook.  It’s a fact; he doesn’t know how.  I, on the other hand, have a catering and hospitality background, so I am passing my cooking and baking knowledge to her.chicken adobo

Since school began in August, she has learned to and can make grilled cheese, fried hot dogs, fried eggs, chicken adobo with rice and ramen.  She has been exposed to making pot roast, pan-seared pork chops (finished in the oven) and baked chicken and chicken wings.

rice

Now, to be be fair, the chicken adobo and rice shown are actually for a church event, but it’s the same food she proudly makes for her family ever week now.  She won’t even let me make it any more and gives ME tips on what I should be doing in the kitchen.  If she only knew, I’ve been at this about 30+ years longer than her.  It’s a cute sentiment though.

In addition on learning important cooking skills, when she has to follow a recipe and using measuring cups and/or spoons, she is reinforcing her fractions.

Lastly, spending time in the kitchen will create memories that one day, she will remember as she stands in her kitchen, showing her children, what I taught her.  Life skills….so important….not just in a technical sense.

Reclaiming HOPE

Learning to Live Well With Fibromyalgia

Wish to Dish

Celebrating food and all the joy that comes from creating and eating it.

Skipping Stones

Musings of a Mindful Disciple

Fearless

Diagnosis of a Chronic Disease Turned My World Upside Down

XP NUGGETS

Your daily source of positivity, motivation and inspiration: Available for you in a charming consumable nugget!

Fact Based Truth

Truth based on facts

The Recipe Hunter

Cook and Enjoy

The Purple Almond

Where food is medicine.

Wedbites

"The Most Important Part of the Most Important Day of Your Life"

Mommy Usage

Perfectly Imperfect. Always Working Toward Better.

But I Smile Anyway...

Musings and memories, words and wisdom... of a working family woman