All posts tagged doctors

Cancer Journey: Part 10

Published March 16, 2018 by lynn k scott

It’s been a bit since my last update.  Life’s been challenging.  I thought I had a handle on things and I really don’t.  I should resign myself to Murphy’s Law and that my house is its headquarters.

Overall, exhaustion has been my new BFF.  Every weekend, I am taking extra naps just to stay functional.  I had another drawn out insurance/specialty pharmacy/doctor’s office issue.  Someone, which no one will own up to, put a notation for pre-authorization on an existing prescription (with one refill left).  This meant, I had to wait for all the different parties to do their job.  After much yelling, crying, sarcasm and general disdain, the issue has finally been resolved.  I had to constant follow-ups for anyone to do their job.  We’re not talking aspirin here, folks.  It’s chemo-medication that costs a small fortune.  You would think those in the medical field would have some compassion and a sense of urgency.  Please don’t hold your breath on that; you’ll end up dead waiting for that to happen.

I have come to the conclusion that once I receive my meds, I will be asking for a referral to a new oncologist.  It’s clear this current office isn’t working out.  I’m sure everyone there will have a small celebration to see me leave.   If you advocate for yourself, it seems you are not the correct type of patient for many of today’s doctors.

It’s sad there are more doctors who care less about working with informed patients, who are in charge in making decisions about their care.  They shouldn’t be made to feel bad about their decisions.  Have snide comments thrown at them, such as “well, you chose not to do IV chemo”.  You’re right, I chose to live my life, not be dependent on everyone, continue working, supporting my family and raising my daughter.  It’s funny, they know how expensive medication and treatment costs, but they chastise you for not giving up your job, going on disability (which doesn’t support much) and losing quality of life.  That’s what going on IV chemo would have done for me.

I working on simplifying areas of my life.  It’s definitely a work in progress.  I know the value of time, family and friends.  Right now, I’m in limbo as to if treatment is working, if I will need more, if I will find out it’s spread.  There are lots of things one can think about while being in such a limbo.  I try to focus on today and accomplish what I can.  Making memories is a top priority, should something change; not for the better.

Either way, ups and downs continue.  It’s a daily battle that I still plan on winning.  I appreciate all who have said prayers, made donations for my care, or can relate to this ongoing struggle.


My Chemo Fundraiser


Cancer Journey – Part 4

Published December 1, 2017 by lynn k scott

This is the second week of the second chemo cycle.  I would say it was almost uneventful; well, up until last night.

I realized I had way too much medication left in one of the bottles.  I realized I hadn’t been taking enough.  Part of that is my error; part is on the doctor and pharmacy for how it was written.  It was written to where the dosage could be take 4 pills daily.  The reality is I was supposed to take 4 pills in the morning and 4 in the evening.  Add in, this new idea of putting all the dosages on the same label, only adds to the confusion.

I will get three and a half days of the correct dosage.  In addition to the poor writing of the prescription, it the oncologist is to blame for refusing to cover the actual dosage with me.  It really goes back to the on-going poor communication.

As I was discharged for the Cancer Center’s care, for lack of communication, I was going on my own these two weeks, with no medical supervision.  It’s proven not to be an issue where the medicine is concerned.

Currently, I’m still not having horrible side effects, which would require a medical professional’s intervention.  Thank heaven for small miracles.  Without having a doctor to consult, my only option would have been to go to the local emergency room.

It’s a sad day when such a serious medical issue is handled so carelessly.  Today, I’m officially registered with a new carrier and provider.  I meet my new Primary doctor next week.  I hope she can get the emergency oncology referral taken care of and I hope I can get my medication next week as well.

I put this as a status (on Facebook) yesterday.  I wish more doctors understood this concept.

If more doctors would realize there are patients in tune with their health and we use them as guidance and not God, healthcare could actually be about care and not maintaining someone.

Continued prayers would be appreciated as this battle is so up-in-the-air.

Cancer Journey: Part 3

Published November 20, 2017 by lynn k scott

The second cycle, of six, started today.  One cycle down?  Not really…and here’s why…

The doctor’s office never discussed the actual dosage that would be mailed to me.  Seeing as these are chemo pills, you can only get them from a specialty pharmacy, via couriered delivery.  The last pharmacy only sent one of two bottles; and the lower dosage of the two.

Then, I find out, my doctor’s office failed to verify which specialty pharmacy the insurance used.  This makes a difference because using the incorrect pharmacy could make the patient fully responsible for paying for otherwise covered medication.  Finally, the correct specialty pharmacy was able to send all the correct medication.

Moving on…I get my blood draw and then see the doctor the next day (like I’m supposed to).  The nurse walks up to me with someone else.  The first person continues on and I see someone standing near me, but not saying anything.  I am playing a game on my phone, passing the time until I am called.  Several minutes pass and she said, “whenever you are ready”.  Wow!  This office really has communication issues.  That being said, my patience for dealing with them was ‘running on fumes’.

I had convinced myself to just get through the appointment.  I could do it!

The office and its occupants had other ideas.  The nurse directed me into a room, never took vitals, told me to take a seat and the doctor came in.  They wanted to “talk”.  The conversation that took place was an already decided upon course of action under the guise of a mutually beneficial conversation.  You know, like when you’re boyfriend or girlfriend says they want to talk and then tells you it might be best if you both saw other people.  Wait!  Did you get the license plate of the bus that just ran over me?  Starting to get the picture of how this office operates?

Basically, I was supposed to sign a document regarding my treatment and they were going to continue letting me receive treatment.  Hmmm…..I already pay insurance premiums for that “right”.  I signed their document and added, “signed under duress”. This didn’t sit well with them.  My stating I was forced to sign their document, which is a prime example of duress, gave them just another reason to say they weren’t going to treat me.

I knew vitals are required after every cycle.  They made no attempt to take them.  They knew I had my next dose of medication.  They knew I mentioned working on getting into a another practice instead of dealing with them.  I don’t trust doctors to begin with and this office was a cancer to my treatment.  Yea….it was that detrimental.

Am I a difficult patient?  Yup!  Do I deserve to have the doctors and their staff treat me with professionalism?  Yup!  Do I deserve to receive clear communication so I can give informed consent for my treatment.  ABSOLUTELY!!!!

However, there is no law from preventing medical doctors from withholding treatment from a patient; even with a potential life-threatening disease.  They don’t need permission, a hearing to remove the patient, or even assist in transferring them to another provider.

What if there isn’t another provider in the area?  Oh well, that’s the patient’s issue; not theirs.  When a practice discharges a patient, as they just had, they won’t take your calls and tell you to go to the Emergency Room if any issues arise.

After all of that, perhaps it was a blessing.  Don’t get me wrong.  I uttered several choice words, shed a few tears, said some prayers and moved on.  I’m getting set-up with a new  provider, within a new network.  I’ve had some friends (online and at church) offer support.

I’ve already got an appointment with a new primary physician, so I can get an emergency oncology referral.  Hoping she can order the necessary blood work, get the next dose of chemo ordered and I can follow-up with my new oncologist.

The situation is less than ideal.  I was on the fence about switching to another carrier/provider.  Perhaps being kicked out of a less-than-healthy medical practice was what was needed.  The group I am switching to has a very good reputation for their oncology department.  Who knows….maybe they will even offer some cancer support groups that weren’t available with my other provider.

Treatment has its ups and downs.  This past week has been such an emotional roller coaster.  I’m looking forward to moving on and getting better.


Cancer Journey: Part 1

Published October 20, 2017 by lynn k scott

I am the first to admit that I am not the ideal patient.  Heck, I’m a barely tolerable patient.  Regardless of my good/bad patient status, effective communication between the doctors/staff and the patient is top priority.  It’s the foundation of a trustful, working relationship between the two.

I admit, I’m extremely direct.  I become irritated very quickly when I have stated expectations and they are either ignored or downplayed.  Add in ill-mannered office staff and a stressful situation turns downright ugly.

Now, we are talking about a cancer center.  A place where emotions run high; especially after patients go and they have been newly diagnosed.  You would think a medical assistant, walking into the waiting room, would have the faintest inkling you don’t try to get the patient’s attention by saying, “hey”.

Sorry, I don’t answer to that.

I was playing a game on my phone when the first “hey” was said.  My husband happened to look up, but didn’t say anything.  As I was non-responsive, this person thought saying, “HEY!” was the next course of action.  This time I did look up.  She stated the doctor’s name and that I needed to come with her.


We walk into the room, where she informs me she will take my vitals.  Hmmm….last I knew, I had the right to consent to any and all treatment; even vitals.  Based on this poor medical assistant’s communication skills in the lobby and now telling me what she will be doing; I think not.

My New York personality emerged to take center stage.  I told her she would not be taking vitals.  She thought putting her hand on her hip, telling me she needed those vitals and whatever blah blah blah she uttered after (I stopped listening) only reinforced my stubborn nature and I promptly dismissed her.


She didn’t take kindly to that.  Arguing with me wasn’t going to work.  If nothing, I’m a stubborn, Irish New Yorker and I’m pictured in the dictionary next to “Stubborn” (ok not really, but I should be).  I still have the right to say no and apparently, she wasn’t taught that patients give consent.  I have a personal issue with being told what I will and won’t do by people who are not in charge.  I didn’t deem vitals necessary for a consultation appointment.  Not to mention, tell me you are taking vitals instead of asking if it’s ok to vitals will get them declined EVERY TIME!

The medical assistant walks through another office door where she proceeds to loudly complain about me.  Well, my first oncology visit is off to a great start.  I’m TICKED off and an unsuspecting doctor is going to walk through the door and he and I will be having words about his medical assistant.

Needless to say, the appointment did not go well.  He kept pushing IV chemotherapy when the benefits are barely above oral chemotherapy and have a lot more side effects.  I don’t know how many times I told him no to IV chemo, but it was obvious that was his preferred method of treatment.  I actually had to tell him not to mention it again.

My husband and I left the appointment and went to a bar.  Wishful thinking the alcohol would kill the cancer.  Oh well, the drink was needed and went down smooth.

Now, after more poor communication with the oncology office, we can’t find a location where I can get a blood draw to take a bunch of poison that will or won’t cure this cancer.  Apparently, the medical profession thinks everyone sits home all day and no one works.  They must think that because no blood draws after 4:00 p.m.

Now I could go to the cancer center.  However, their poor treatment of me and lack of communication skills raises my anxiety 10-fold.  I don’t even want to go there for the necessary appointments.

The situation is so bad, I’m looking at driving 20 minutes out of my way, and maybe incurring bridge toll, in order to go to a better facility because I’m not receiving proper care where I am.

My positive mood about getting through this has changed into being angry about having cancer.  I don’t want to see doctors, nurses and anyone associated with the medical profession.  I hate the cancer center.  It just reminds me of the family I lost.  It reminds me how this disease has made strong people weak before it took their lives.

Needless to say, my mood is less an amicable at the moment.  I deactivated my Facebook account because I am having trouble just interacting with online friends.  I will probably reactivate it again, but saying that I’m overwhelmed is an understatement.


Now for the curve ball…

Published September 15, 2017 by lynn k scott

I haven’t posted in awhile; longer than it should have been.  I’ve been struggling with my health.  For those of you who follow this blog, you’re aware I am less than a fan of the medical profession.   Ok, ok, I actually loathe it and view dealing with doctors and health facilities as a necessary evil.

I’ve had multiple issues trying to be seen for an ongoing issue.  First specialists were only working when I had to pick my daughter up from school.  Perish the thought they work past 3 o’clock.  Then, I couldn’t find a native English-speaking doctor.  Hold up…hop off that train of thought you are beginning to process.  I had a non-native doctor dismiss my symptoms because she didn’t take me seriously.  When she finds it appropriate to recommend a banana and drinking more water (without knowing my dietary habits), yup, it justifies walking out and asking for a US-born physician.  Heaven-forbid wanting an English-speaking doctor is the sin the medical practice made it out to be.  How dare I? Sorry, hiring native Spanish-speaking, Farsi-speaking, Chinese-speaking doctors, for the comfort of the patient is no different than what I was asking.  All in all, I ended up being banned for my instance on seeing a female doctor; whose first language was English.

Onto waiting for the first of the month to be seen by another practice.  Oh, I’m a new patient and haven’t been “established”.  That means my necessary appointment can wait an additional two weeks while the insurance carrier and practitioner discriminate new and established patients and refuse to give them the next available appointment.

Finally!  I see a doctor.  She regurgitates a peptic ulcer that I was treated for a year ago and I’m there to see her about the same issue as the treatment was effective.  She cannot understand my not wanting a scope stuck down my throat to test for an ulcer that I tell her I am not suffering from; that something else is wrong.  She tells me I have insurance and can’t see the big deal in my refusal.  Ummm…invasive and a 20% copay AFTER a $1500 deductible.  Welcome to the real world, Doc.  I refill the ulcer meds anyway. I message her for three days in a row:  medicine is not working.

I gave up.  She was ignoring me because I refused an unnecessary procedure.  I chose to look the other way regarding my copays and headed to the Emergency Room (ER).  The ER thanked me for coming in.  I apparently have Intussusception.   That’s being caused by Tubulovillous of the colon.

Needless to say, I am already sick of dealing with the G.I. dept, the oncology dept, as well as constant communication with my surgeon.  Yup, next week I go under the knife for a few hours to have a good section of my colon removed.  The ulcer, that two doctors said I have was actually a polyp that grew to be 10-15 cm and is blocking 80% of my colon. I paid copay after copay, because I was in PAIN.  Let me tell you, the pain is nothing short of being in second to third stage labor, for weeks at a time.  I have been trying to resolve this, actively, for over a year.  Doctors:  LISTEN TO YOUR PATIENTS!!!

I’m glad to have a diagnosis and treatment plan.  I’m not happy with knowing, every doctor I have spoken with, while telling me we will have to wait for pathology, believes I have cancer.  We have to wait for the mass to be removed and tested.

I can deal with having cancer, if that’s what the test shows.  Telling my kids, esp. my older children who watched both my parents get diagnosed and ultimately watched my father and sister lose their cancer battles is scary.  Telling my 11-year old, who is basically being raised as an only child is terrifying.  She is already emotional with my first hospital stay and my upcoming surgery and longer hospital adventure. She has heard the word, ‘cancer’, but has no idea what it truly means. Children shouldn’t feel afraid for their parents.

While my family, friends and church have been extremely supportive, whenever you are forced to face your mortality, your brain goes into overdrive.  I have given this to God.  I know he has a plan for me; even if I don’t understand it.  I am used to being independent. I don’t want those who depend on me to worry.  I just pray for strength for my family.

The doctor will see you now…NOT!

Published February 10, 2017 by lynn k scott

No one in today’s world can question the reality that the face of your medical care has changed.  With new laws, requirements, insurance requirements and medical office billing, trying to see “your” doctor isn’t always your choice.

Whether you have a chronic medical condition or just need to be seen for newly developed symptoms, making an appointment isn’t as easy as it used to be.  In today’s world, the emergence of Nurse Practitioners (NP) and Physician’s Assistants (PA) are the new “in” thing.

“Hi, I’d like to make a doctor’s appointment”.

Seem’s like a simple enough request.  After all, most of us are pay enormous premiums and/or copays for the privilege of a doctor to spend 10 minutes with us.  That’s in addition to two or three patients being scheduled for the same time slot so the doctor doesn’t lose any money, should there be a cancellation.

“Sure, you there is an appointment with Jean Smith at 3:30.”

There you go…your appointment…WAIT!  Where was the word “doctor” to go with that name?  Ahh…did you catch that too?  That’s because in this case, you won’t be seeing a doctor; but a PA instead.

Awesome.  No, not really.  I already have issues with doctors “practicing” medicine.  If I’m going to drop $45 on an appointment that a General Practitioner wasn’t able to resolve, why in God’s name would I entrust an on-going, chronic issue, to someone who isn’t even a board-certified doctor?

I don’t have the flu and I don’t need a throat culture performed.  I need a real diagnosis, made by a doctor, that will resolve my issue; the first time around.  “Oh, sorry, there are no doctor appointments available then”.  Don’t you just love the system?

Truth be told, PAs and NAs are half the price of a real doctor.  They are in even in the specialist’s office…the specialist!  Someone who may, or may not, have done any clinical work, who is now entrusted to see, diagnose and treat you, independent of a doctor reviewing their work.

Does that leave you with the same lack of confidence it does for me?  So, what are the other options?  Urgent care…yea..seeing a doctor, at double the cost of your primary’s copay only to refer you to your primary doctor.  The emergency room.  You’re in pain.  You have severe symptoms; chronic symptoms…just go to the emergency room.  Sure all the testing will be done right then.  You’ll be lucky if you only walk out owing about $2,000 as your portion of this wonderful care provided by your insurance.

All this, because carriers and medical offices prefer using under-qualified medical personnel instead of having you treated by a physician of your choosing.  After all, it’s only your hard-earned dollar that is footing this medical nightmare, right?

If you’re vegan than you are neglectful

Published April 6, 2015 by lynn k scott

If you’re vegan than your neglectful?  Did I just say that?  Did I just infuriate an entire dietary population?  No, because I don’t believe that.  I am doing exactly what a headline did because a pediatrician in Florida seemed to have a communication breakdown with a new mom regarding her newborn baby.

The article and video in this link illustrates to me just how judgmental and abusive those in power, such as doctors, can be. When a 12-day old baby was brought in for a checkup, the doctor wanted the baby to have a formula supplement because of a latching issue caused by a tongue defect.  When the mother raised concerns she was a strict vegan and a needed non-animal supplement for the baby, the emergency room was the option the doctor insisted on.

It begs the question why the doctor didn’t give the mother a soy-based formula, which is vegan safe, and let the infant have a bottle in the office?  Did the doctor get uppity because the mother of the newborn dared to question something that went against her dietary belief?  Did the mother not have the right to choose to spend $30 (give or take) at the grocery store on soy-based formula instead of getting raped in the emergency room with their ridiculous fees to provide the same treatment the mother was planning to do at home?

Was it necessary to arrest the mother for doing exactly the same treatment at home?  Oh wait, she disobeyed a doctor’s suggestion.  While failure to thrive and dehydration are serious issues for an infant, it was suspected, according to the article. The doctor didn’t give the mother a chance to give the baby a soy-formula bottle to see if that would help the situation.  Had the mother been able to see another pediatrician, perhaps a less judgmental one, this entire situation could have been avoided.

The fact that the mother was keeping check-up appointments, seeking another opinion and doing what the doctor suggested, just not in the manner the doctor would have preferred, shows she was not neglectful.  I am in the minority, according the comments on the article, that side with the mother.

I personally hope this doctor is sued, loses his practice and learns he is not god.  He doesn’t get to enforce his suggestions as law.  This doctor obviously did not agree with the vegan mother.  The article tried to tie the two situations together, which really had nothing to do with each other.  Vegan breast milk is the same as any other breast milk.  A tongue defect preventing latching while breast feeding will still be an issue regardless of the mother’s diet.

While I personally could never follow a vegan lifestyle, I did follow a vegetarian one for almost a decade.  It’s not for the medical profession to decide how you should eat.  After all, if that were the case, McDonald’s and the like would be out of business by now.  They should advise all legitimate avenues and then allow sound-minded individuals to follow what they feel is best.  This doctor’s overstepping stripped a mother and child of 5 months of bonding time.  That is inexcusable simply because she just didn’t wouldn’t do exactly what he said, in the time frame he said it.

Luke 23:43 Jesus answered him, “Truly I tell you, today you will be with me in paradise.”

Photo by Matthew C Seufer - Oak Grove Baptist Church- Elgin,South Carolina USA June 10,2013 (Page 14 in the Inspirational book "Windows From Heaven")


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